Indigenous Peoples Day gift: “No Machine” live in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading

A keen Indigenous Peoples Day to you all.

I am deep in the final stages of preparing for an international trip that will be the foundation of the next few months of my writing, but on my way out of town, I want to share my latest publication: “No Machine” in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading.

It’s a little flash fiction and I’m thrilled to have it out in the world. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to make sure I have enough socks for the next couple weeks.

“Words on Air” live and Convergence Feature

I recently mentioned (here) that an interview I did with Susannah Sharpless of Graywolf Press would be airing on the new series “Words on Air” from Oklahoma State’s Center for Poets and Writers. Well, that episode is now live. It’s a casual introduction to publishing and the value of small presses like Graywolf.

Words on Air with Susannah Sharpless.

Also,  I’d like to note a recent feature from Mvskoke Media on the upcoming interdisciplinary, multi-media art exhibit I’m co-curating (mentioned here). Liz Gray did a great job accurately and efficiently introducing the show and some of the original thinking that led to its creation. I’m thrilled and grateful for the feature. And, more and more, I’m growing excited to see the work being submitted, though I know when it comes time to make selections, I’m going to have to make some very tough calls.

A part, not apart.

“No Machine” to appear in Electric Literature

I just got done signing the contract for a flash fiction piece that will be appearing in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading this fall. Early indications suggest that it’ll appear in vol. 33 in October. One could bet their butt that I will announce it and link directly to the story once it’s out in the world.

The story draws heavily from my time working with captive apes and is another in a long line of attempts where I try to use fiction to capture elements of the personhood of nonhuman beings (apes here) that I couldn’t doing science. I demoed this story in February, opening for George Saunders for a reading here in Tulsa (mentioned in this post).

If anyone is interested in seeing what kinds of work EL’s Recommended Reading publishes, check out the fantastic, little post-apocalyptic flash piece, told in a single sentence, by my fellow TAFwriter, Simon Han, “How to Eat Well at the End of the World.”

After Action Reports- Veterans Workshop

The spring and summer of 2018 have been more focused on creating and submitting proposals for events and projects as they have been about actual writing. And as such, I’ve had little to show, publication-wise, for the year, but I’ve been able to create and participate in more events with my community here in Tulsa. That may not inflate my sense of writer-legitimacy, but I think it soothes the soul by bringing meaningful work to audiences who may or may not otherwise have access to it.

That said, another of the projects I’ve been preparing for has been announced and this one is near to my heart.

John Musgrave
John Musgrave— Marine, Poet, Father

After Action Reports is a joint reading/workshop for veterans and their families that I will be facilitating with my father, John Musgrave (recently featured in the Ken Burns Documentary The Vietnam War). This reading comes from two sources: my father’s writing (available here), which has always been a means of healing and processing for him after returning from Vietnam; and my strange relationship to his war, having grown up both utterly disconnected from it and yet intimately shaped by it. After Action Reports hopes to offer tools for how to make writing a viable tool for for veterans and their families, through the combined perspectives of a Marine Infantryman and his adult, civilian son.

For more information, including time, location, and dates of the event, please see the official announcement from the McKeon Center for Creativity.

Convergence— Call for Artists

Sunrise Hunt
“Sunrise Hunt,” Oil on canvas, by Yatika Fields 2018

I’m pleased to announce I’ll be curating a multi-media, interdisciplinary art exhibit and workshop this coming year at the Center for Creativity in downtown Tulsa. The show will examine humanity’s place in the world with a goal of challenging the commonly held western ontology of humans as separate from or special among the natural world. I will be joined as curator by one of my good friends, fellow Osage, and Tulsa Artist Fellow, Yatika Starr Fields. Yatika’s work is an inspiration to me and it embodies much of the aims of this upcoming show and I couldn’t have asked for a better collaborator.

As a part of the show, I will be giving a craft talk on how to be present in the natural world through photography and writing, using examples from my own process. From this workshop, Yatika will gather ideas for, design, and paint a mural that will live in the Center for Creativity.

The Call for Artists PDF can be found here: Convergence: Challenging Anthropocentrism.

For additional information, or to read the Call for Artists in html, please see here: Call for Artists.

To see more of Yatika’s amazing and moving art, you can find him at Yatikafields.com.

New web series— Words on Air

This has been a summer of drafting and traveling, so the publication news has been sparse. However, I’d like to let everyone know that OSU’s Center for Poets and Writers is releasing a new web series, “Words on Air.” The series will be uploading new episodes weekly for at least the next couple months with more to come at a later date.

As a part of Tulsa LitFest, I had the pleasure of interviewing the illustrious Susannah Sharpless of Graywolf Press and this conversation will soon be released as part of “Words on Air.” My goal with the discussion was to provide an introduction to parsing the publication landscape at large and Graywolf Press itself.

If you get a chance, check it out. The series will feature some of my colleagues from the Tulsa Artist Fellowship as well as some of the best writers in Oklahoma.

Catch me at Tulsa Litfest

small-press-panel-graphic

Anyone who is around Tulsa in late April should register for and stop by the first ever Tulsa LitFest, presented by the Tulsa Artist Fellowship. Spots are limited and filling fast so registration is highly recommended.

I’ll be moderating a Small Press Panel with a few incredible publishers:

AWST PRESS: Awst Press, based in Austin, TX, features impressive work from diverse voices. Awst endeavors to support authors through each project and beyond by increasing their respective audiences, playing an active role in the editorial and publishing process of all projects, promoting their activities well past their publication with Awst via the website and social media, and seeking ways to compensate them for their efforts including generous royalties and identifying grants for which they might be eligible.

DEEP VELLUM PUBLISHING: Deep Vellum Publishing is a not-for-profit literary arts organization that seeks to enhance the open exchange of ideas among cultures and to connect the world’s greatest writers with English-language readers through publishing international literature in translation, while fostering the art and craft of translation, and promoting a more vibrant literary community in the Dallas community and beyond.

GRAYWOLF PRESS: Graywolf Press is a leading independent publisher committed to the discovery and energetic publication of twenty-first century American and international literature.

SIBLING RIVARY PRESS: Sibling Rivalry Press, one of the country’s premier independent presses focusing on LGBT literature and poetry, is based in Little Rock, Arkansas, with a mission to publish work that disturbs and enraptures. Its books, authors, interior design, cover art, and overall vision have been honored by the Lambda Literary Foundation, the American Library Association, and the Library of Congress, who, by special invitation, houses SRP’s entire catalog in its Rare Book and Special Collections Division.